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Oakwood University Wins USCAA National Men’s Basketball Championship
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Submitted: Mar 30, 2012
By Adventist Today News Team


The Oakwood University Ambassadors men’s basketball team bested the Rochester College Warriors in the national Division I championship tournament of the United States Collegiate Athletic Association (USCAA) last Saturday night. Except for dedicated sports page readers, this win was largely ignored due to the more prominent “March Madness” events of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).
 
This is the second time that the Oakwood team has won this national championship. Those who have seen the came have told Adventist Today that it was a spectacular example of why basketball is fun to watch. The game was fast and the points close. Oakwood student Austin Doggette won it for his team at the last minute, sinking a long shot. The final score was 54 to 51 and Doggette was given the MVP honors for the tournament.
 
Oakwood went into the game without much indication that it could win. It was seventh-seeded and Rochester was seeded number one. The game began late because the Oakwood team refused to play until after the end of the Sabbath at sundown.
 
“We lost to a very good team,” Rochester coach Klint Pleasants was quoted by sports writer Dan Strickradt on North Oakland Sports, a web sports news publisher. “But that’s basketball, a game sometimes decided by a play or two.”
 
USCAA Division I sports involve smaller colleges and universities than the NCAA. A number of Seventh-day Adventist colleges and universities participate in this and other leagues despite historic denominational positions against competitive sports.
 

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Linda Taylor
2012-03-31 7:34 AM

It is sad that we won.  What were we doing there in the first place?  We are truly going the way of the world.  I don't think waiting till the Sabbath was over was much of a witness.  I did not attend my ten year class reunion in 1986 because they do things on the Sabbath.  I was told by my fellow classmates that my not being there made more of an impression than if I had come.  I thanked them for the compliment.  We are suppose to be a people of God, not of the world.  Come out and be ye seperate.  What a sad day it is for us as a people and as a witness. 

Ed Fry
2012-04-14 9:24 AM

Linda..."We are suppose to be a people of God, not of the world.  Come out be ye separate."  Isn't surfing the world wide web and commenting on a news story on this website being part of the world?  Where can one go and not be part of the "world"?

Truth Seeker
2012-04-01 8:55 PM

"The Seventh-day Adventist Church is opposed to interschool league play (commonly known as varsity athletics) in its educational system. The major rationale for this is:

1) The inherent hazards of competitive rivalry have the potential to be exaggerated in interorganizational events; and

2) The commitments of time, personnel, and finances are usually disproportionate to the number of individuals able to participate."

 http://adventist.org/beliefs/statements/main-stat29.html

Have we totally ignored the mandate regarding sports? The world is sports crazy -- why do we participate?

justew
2012-04-07 11:53 PM

Congratulations, OU. Glad to see Adventists making marks in the sports world.

Charles Eaton
2012-04-12 4:18 PM

I...am honestly flabbergasted by the first two posts here.  A Seventh-day Adventist university wins a sporting competition, something that should be celebrated as it adds positive publicity to our church and schools, yet is met on this site with disdain and spirtual condemnation.  In a denomination saturated with Bible Bowl competitions and Pathfinder drill/drum tournaments, this reeks hypocracy.  "It is sad that we won?"  Unbelievable.  

Horace Butler
2012-04-12 8:30 PM

I see, Charles, that you, too, have forgotten what the priorities are for the SDA Church.  When we place sports on such a high pedastal, other, more important things must inevitably suffer.

I find it embarrassing that professed Adventists have entered the competitive world of varsity athletics.  Not only do they participate in it, they do so with no qualms, as if our clearly stated guidelines against it didn't exist.  The world may bow to the sports god, but we were called to show them something better.  Instead, too many among us are joining with those who have little interest in eternal things.  One may argue that many Christians participate in these sporting leagues, but that doesn't justify it.  They have confused priorities.  And they haven't been given the counsel that we have.  They can be excused somewhat; but we are without excuse.

Another example of how the spirit of worldliness has entered the church.  And so many are in denial.

Lest someone draw erroneous conclusions about my attitude toward sports, I should point out that I used to be an avid sports fan.  So I've been there and done that.  I played; I routed for my favorite teams; the whole ball of wax.  I am ashamed to admit that I even used to pray for my favorite team.  Talk about appealing to God in trivial matters!  That was years ago.  A waste of time and effort, resulting from confused priorities.

The spirit of competition is diametrically opposed to what the gospel message is all about.

Elaine Nelson
2012-04-13 12:27 PM

What other "worldliness" should also be condemned?  Sports is only one that was mentioned in "our clearly stated guidelines."  How has this attitude been attracting active, energetic young people?  To be true to following those "clearly stated guidlines" what recreation outside work and school would meet approval? 

Ervin Taylor
2012-04-13 11:15 AM

I do wish that those who decry a Adventist college wining a sports competition might wish to become acquainted with 20th century reality. I'm not even asking them to become part of 21st century world.
 
The opposition of classical Adventism to competitive sports reflected the self-inflicted isolation from main stream American society that was a necessary part of creating an Adventist self-identity as a "peculiar people," waiting for the "End of the World," collected in their little enclaves where those "in the Truth" could congregate uncontaminated by "The World."
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I guess one message to those that wish to retain that kind of identity is "lighten up and smell the roses." Why do you think there is a rush for the back door of our church by so many of the younger generation? Do you really think that the GYC model is going to work in the long run for more than a small percentage? If you do, I have this bridge . . .

Horace Butler
2012-04-13 7:56 PM

We finally agree on something, Dr. Taylor.  The GYC model is not going to work for more than a small percentage, but, then, based on past history, one would not expect more than a few to be left standing when the dust settles.  That's why the concept of a remnant is so prevalent in Scripture.  "As it was in the days of Noah . . . ."

Horace Butler
2012-04-14 8:13 AM

I should have added that the gospel model works for only a few, as well.  "Many are called, but few are chosen."

Kristin Woods
2012-04-15 3:53 PM

All of these comments are very interesting. The disappointment of people who feel that Oakwood should have never been in the competition does sadden me. No one at the university places the importance of sports on a high pedastal. Academics and honoring God are the main focus. The school believes that the students need to be well rounded in social and physical as well as educational and spiritual development. There are times when God calls His people to do things that others may not agree with or understand but is still for His glory in the long run. I have been told by many of the basketball players that they were respected for their position of not playing during the Sabbath hours and it sparked interest in some of the members of the other teams in our religion. You may not agree with it but God was glorified in the outcome. Also, if we do not believe in any forms of competition then we shouldn't apply for jobs or seek scholarchips for school because those and others situations are all a form of competition.

Christen
2012-04-16 4:55 PM

EGW's very interesting message about competitive sports in 7th day schools.

"Christ looks upon a world filled with the din of merchandise and trade, with the dishonesty and scheming of buyers and sellers. In their desire to get gain, men have lost sight of the laws of justice and equity. "It is naught, it is naught, saith the buyer: but when he is gone his way, then he boasteth." Satan has devised a multitude of ways in which to keep men from serving God. He has invented sports and games, into which men enter with such intensity that one would suppose a crown of life was to reward the winner. At the horse races and football matches, which are attended by thousands and thousands of people, lives for which Christ shed his blood are thrown away. What will become of the souls of the men and boys whose lives are thus extinguished? Will they be counted worthy of the redemption which Christ died to secure for them? Looking upon these God-dishonoring scenes, Christ asks, "What is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?" He calls the attention of men to the nobler world which they have lost from view. He points them to the threshold of heaven, flushed with the glory of the infinite God. Review and Herald June 13, 1907" 

 


christen white
2012-04-16 6:05 PM

EGW offers council on this topic. Sports activity are good but competition changes the focus of our overall mission.

"Christ looks upon a world filled with the din of merchandise and trade, with the dishonesty and scheming of buyers and sellers. In their desire to get gain, men have lost sight of the laws of justice and equity. "It is naught, it is naught, saith the buyer: but when he is gone his way, then he boasteth." Satan has devised a multitude of ways in which to keep men from serving God. He has invented sports and games, into which men enter with such intensity that one would suppose a crown of life was to reward the winner. At the horse races and football matches, which are attended by thousands and thousands of people, lives for which Christ shed his blood are thrown away. What will become of the souls of the men and boys whose lives are thus extinguished? Will they be counted worthy of the redemption which Christ died to secure for them? RH June 13, 1907, par. 5


Elaine Nelson
2012-04-16 7:41 PM

Is there some area of life where there is no competition?  Students must often compete for admission to a school of their choice; job hunters will nearly always compete with other qualified individuals for a job.  If you have a business you are always in competition with others who are also in the same business.  Competition is part of life unless one chooses to be a hermit.

Elaine Nelson
2012-04-16 7:41 PM

Is there some area of life where there is no competition?  Students must often compete for admission to a school of their choice; job hunters will nearly always compete with other qualified individuals for a job.  If you have a business you are always in competition with others who are also in the same business.  Competition is part of life unless one chooses to be a hermit.

christen white
2012-04-16 9:17 PM

It is no unknown fact that one of the most dangerous places a family can be at on various occasions is a little league baseball game. Adults teach prejudice, which is a negative form of competition, to innocent children. Competition may not be bad under the right circumstance such as things that stimulate the mind like bible bowls or learning memory verses, educational stimulating events. Physical competitions are temporal idolatrous forms of self gratification. Friends have often told me that at some christian sporting events police must be present. This is alarming don't you think?

justew
2012-04-17 3:07 AM

Christen ...

Have you ever been to a little league baseball game?
Better question ... have you ever been to a church board meeting?

--Stew.

Horace Butler
2012-04-17 5:59 AM

I can't speak for Christen, but I've been to both (although the last little league ball game I attended was in about 1965--back when parents used to behave themselves for the most part).  Both events sometimes bring out the worst in human nature.  Sporting events are competitive by nature; board meetings are not supposed to be that way.  The extent to which they degenerate into a verbal boxing match is a indicator of how far the board has wandered from true Christianity.  Sporting events foster a selfish competitive spirit.  Board meetings (church board, that is) do not foster that, except among those who are unconverted.  Sort of like the disciples always contending for the highest place right up until the Crucifixion.  They were not yet fully converted.

justew
2012-04-17 6:53 AM

agreed. point being that it isn't the activity, it's the people and their behavior...

Charles Eaton
2012-04-18 4:25 PM

This sums it up perfectly.

christen white
2012-04-17 12:51 PM

I agree with both of you and while life goes on Sister White also tells us

"We are on the very verge of the time of trouble, and perplexities that are scarcely dreamed of are before us. A power from beneath is leading men to war against Heaven. Human beings have confederated with satanic agencies to make void the law of God. The inhabitants of the world are fast becoming as the inhabitants of the world in Noah’s day, who were swept away by the Flood, and as the inhabitants of Sodom, who were consumed by fire from heaven. The powers of Satan are at work to keep minds diverted from eternal realities. The enemy has arranged matters to suit his own purposes. Worldly business, sports, the fashions of the day—these things occupy the minds of men and women. Amusements and unprofitable reading spoil the judgment. In the broad road that leads to eternal ruin there walks a long procession. The world, filled with violence, reveling, and drunkenness, is converting the church. The law of God, the divine standard of righteousness, is declared to be of no effect.*1909, Testimonies for the Church 9:43-48.


Ervin Taylor
2012-04-17 10:21 PM

I'm glad that the EGW quote from 1909 was posted for us to read.  I'm guessing here, but, I suspect that the reason that it was quoted by the individual who posted it is that it was assumed that EGW's opinions would somehow carry some weight for Adventists living in 2012. For some, that might be correct, However for many other Adventists, she was an interesting 19th Century Christian devotional writer and that's about it. 

May I suggest another take on this quotation--EGW's views on this topic are very similiar to many outspoken conservative evangelical Christian writers of her generation.  Actually, her wording here is mild compared to how others sharing her world view expressed their outrage at the sinfulness of the times.  At least EGW did not condemn sinners to an eternal burning hell!  If one is looking for a positive take on her words without having to agree with her views here, that might be mentioned.  .    :   

christen white
2012-04-18 2:41 PM

Ervin, Mrs. White was a true prophet and speaks of everything happening today in 2012 and in 2012 it still does not matter what progressive adventist think or dont think of her. This is not a popularity contest. You can get that at the mega churches everywhere, teaching people to believe there is salvation through praise and worship or in entertaining the crowd, dubiously leading them down the wide path of palatable deception. I can sing till I am red in the face, but if I walk out of church an unconverted person all that singing won't pass the roof top. If I am thinking about that competition during the sacred hours of church, watching the 2nd hand till game time, that is idoltry. It's good to be creative and interesting, but that can be done without watering down the truth. The message is an alarming one because we all need to be alarmed, but many hearers are not doers preferring all the music and entertainment and feel good sermons that keep the crowd lulling on the middle of the fence.

Charles Eaton
2012-04-18 4:30 PM

There is a distinct difference between finding fault with making an idol of sporting events, and participating in sporting events period.  I have no qualms with the first, and would agree with EW in that many people do indeed turn sporting events, as well as fashion and business, into gods.  I do think, however, that attempting to expand that into a one-rule-fits-all which says we should not play sports does us no good in our attempt to win believers for Christ's cause.  Especially when so much is made out of being "good sportsmen" these days. 

Ervin Taylor
2012-04-18 5:03 PM

I'm happy for Christen if she believes that EGW was a "true prophet."  I assume that this belief is helpful to Christen.  However to state that EGW speaks to :"everything happening today" is a faith statement without empirical support.  EGW, like the Biblical prophets, was a product of her time and place.  It seems to me that some of her views, like some of the views of the Biblical prophets, are helpful in the modern world, but many of them are not.  I'm sure some will disagree.  Is it not amazing that we can hold very different opinions about EGW and the Biblical prophets and be members of the same faith community?.

Thomas
2012-04-19 8:59 AM

I wonder why their are so many EGW qoutes and not enough bible qoutes? Education can be just as competitive, in America sports are put on a pedestal, in Korea education is. You see and hear young teenagers cause suicede, because they could not achieve those results. I have seen this in countries like Kenya too. I am simply asking a question and would love to be clarified if I am wrong.

christen white
2012-04-19 5:24 PM

Her writings are very helpful to me in my overall studies. I believe anyone that does not believe in Mrs White is not a true 7th Day Adventist. The evidence is empirically there too but first step is, you must read her books (often more than once and in context) to know what her forsight was, and of course study the bible to confirm her claims then just sit back and read the news paper, read history books, watch political climates and its a whole in one. Whats most surreal is her describing the internal apostasy that would plague the church prior to Jesus return.

Kevin Riley
2012-04-19 7:13 PM

Ellen White and her contemporaries were very clear that she was not to be made 'a test of fellowship', which means not believing in her as a prophet does not make someone not a 'true' SDA. 

Anonymous



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